Royal Corner

Megxit's Canadian Con

As Megxit comes to a close, and Harry and Meghan are revealed to have left Canada for Los Angeles, have they conned us all with their Megxit plan?


MARCH 28th, 2020

The Duke & Duchess of Sussex arrive at the annual Commonwealth Day Service at Westminster Abbey - © Getty Images

I

t’s hard to believe that in two days’ time Megxit will be completed. With countless headlines and constant commentary on the Duke and Duchess of Sussexes decision to step back as working members of The Royal Family, it was beginning to feel like there was no end in sight. But whilst much criticism was made over the way in which Harry and Meghan planned to exit the Monarchy, it is the latest revelations that has perplexed and frustrated those living beyond the borders of the UK.

In an exclusive article, Rebecca English – Royal Editor for the Daily Mail – revealed that the Sussexes were now living in Los Angeles, having fled the multi-million-pound Canadian mansion they were kindly offered freely to reside in. And whilst moving to a different country may not seem befitting of the growing criticism, the timing, optics and perceived planning does.

Harry and Meghan visit Canada House in London to thank staff after the planned six-week break over Christmas - © Getty Images


The world was stunned by the initial announcement that Harry and Meghan would be stepping back as working Royals. Their official statement released in conjunction with the news painted a wishful and unworkable model for a half-in, half-out role. The couple stated they would work to ‘financial independence’ and create a ‘new progressive role’ within the monarchy.

They would base themselves in Canada, allowing easy access to the US, where Meghan’s mother Doria lives, whilst being able to honour their roles as President and Vice-President of the Queen’s Commonwealth Trust. As Canada is a member of the Commonwealth, it vaguely made sense.

However, the statement – released without The Queen’s consent – quickly sank beneath the inevitable scrutiny, and as the infamous ‘Sandringham Summit’ was finalised, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex were quickly looking at a very different scaled-down royal role.

Harry and Meghan attend the Endeavour Awards in London - © Getty Images


Many supporters of Harry and Meghan have stated that the instant critiques of the ‘original’ Megxit plan was unjustified and unfair. Why couldn’t they have their cake and eat it? Why couldn’t they aim for financial independence and a new progressive role whilst basing themselves in Canada? These questions led to unreasonable and unfounded accusations that the Royal Family were jealous of the couple, trying their upmost to dowse Harry and Meghan’s ‘star power’.

With sensible and constitutional explanations, the Sussexes original plan was never going to work. But with the revelation that the couple have now abandoned Canada, setting up a permanent home in California, was the initial plan a smokescreen for something altogether different?

Months on from that final summit the latter is becoming more and more plausible. Royal Reporters have been stating for months that the Duke and Duchess saw Los Angeles as the endgame. Once again, supporters of the couple called foul on these assumptions, though now have been subsequently proven wrong.

But with this new plan coming to light, it is starting to force those who perhaps once supported the couple, to question their actions and decisions.

Harry, Meghan and Archie in South Africa in 2019 - © Getty Images


Upon Harry and Meghan’s return to the UK much noise was made over their refusal to bring their son Archie to see his great-grandparents. At such delicate ages – the Queen is 94 this year and the Duke of Edinburgh 99 respectively – it is a valid question to ask why the Sussexes wouldn’t wish their son to spend precious time with his great-grandparents. The answer was the growing Coronavirus pandemic, with the couple feeling that bringing Archie to British shores would be too dangerous.

Fast-forward three-weeks and the public were left scratching their heads as to why then, they would take their 10-month old son from the relative safety of British Columbia in Canada – which so far has 725 cases of the deadly virus and 14 deaths – to the US state of California, which has 4,905 cases and 102 deaths? Why leave a country which is fourteenth on the WHO’s pandemic list of known Coronavirus cases, to the country which has quickly become the epicentre of the global crisis? “Out of the fire, into the frying pan”, seems to come to mind.

This revelation adds to a growing list detailing Harry and Meghan’s ability to do the complete opposite of what they tell you they plan on doing.

We heard from sources close to the couple that any move to America wasn’t on the cards as long as President Trump was still in Office. They seem to have changed their mind, and ironically could end up having to ask Donald Trump for ‘special help’ to access the US-taxpayer funded Secret Service Protection programme. After the recent embarrassing leaked phone calls, whereby Harry referred to the President as having “blood on his hands”, I wouldn’t bet my tiara on it.

This also leads serious questions over their assertation that they would strive for ‘financial independence’, though they are still expecting the public to continue paying for their security. The environment is deeply important to them, yet they flew to Los Angeles by Private Jet (again). The Sussexes wished to uphold the values of the Queen and help support the Monarch, yet decided to abandon a Commonwealth country in the midst of the deadliest pandemic in a generation. “The UK will always be their home,” Harry stated in his emotional speech after the Sandringham meeting, yet they flew to California and not to the UK where Harry’s father Prince Charles is recovering from Coronavirus.

Prince Harry pictured in Canada with his son Archie - © SussexRoyal


It seems that when it comes to Harry and Meghan, Queen and country comes last. Harry and Meghan come first – always.

With America the new hub of brand Sussex… (TBD), it is no wonder Canadians are feeling conned by the couple. With great aplomb, Harry and Meghan’s friends were singing like canaries over how much they loved their new life in Canada. Mountainous walks, sprawling landscapes with barely any paparazzi, locals who were determined to honour the couple’s privacy. Everything which Harry and Meghan had bemoaned about the UK and the tabloid press was non-existent here. So, what happened?

The reality of financial independence – that’s what.

Come April 1st – ironically April Fool’s Day – the couple will no longer be deemed ‘Internationally Protected Persons’. This means that in countries like Canada, Harry and Meghan will no longer be eligible for Tax-funded security. It is of no coincidence that merely weeks after the Canadian Government declared the country would no longer support the couple’s security costs, that they abandon Canada and bring their intended plan of moving to Los Angeles forward.

Harry and Meghan alongside the Duke & Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall leaving the Commonwealth Day Service - © Getty Images


Furthermore, spending such a prolonged time between two countries could leave the Sussexes paying tax in both Canada and the US, highlighting that to achieve the dream of financial independence is a costly affair.

But in choosing to live in Los Angeles – the capital city of celebrity – a cost pricier than money will be at stake. Paparazzi are notorious in the US, with organisations like TMZ mercilessly trailing celebrities wherever they go. And unlike British Columbia and the UK, where strict media laws are in place, it is a virtual free-for-all in California.

In a much-advertised documentary with Tom Bradby, Prince Harry spoke about the pressures of fame and the constant media intrusion into his life. He also spoke about the damaging effect the paparazzi had on his mother and subsequently himself. “Every single time I hear a click, every single time I see a flash, it takes me straight back,” he said. If that is the case, then why move to the city where camera clicks, and flashes are more common than the Los Angeles sunsets?

The truth is, when it comes to Harry and Meghan, there’s a lot that no longer makes sense. From their first Megxit plan months ago, to now, everything has changed. The optics of fleeing a country in the midst of a global pandemic – one whereby your grandmother is Head of State – looks callous and self-serving. Stating you want privacy and then moving to the centre of Hollywood, simply doesn’t add up.

The Duke & Duchess of Cambridge await the arrival of the Queen with Harry and Meghan behind - © AP


The sad reality is, and it is one which grows clearer day-by-day, is the vast majority of us have been conned. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were never really in this for the Commonwealth, the Canadians, the British Public and certainly not for the Queen and the Royal Family. And sadly, it has left most asking whether privacy really was an issue? Were the constant headlines too much? Or was it all just an ill-advised plan to promote, promote, promote?

As Megxit day quickly approaches, the chapter of Harry and Meghan and the Monarchy ends. It most likely is the best outcome for all involved. And whilst The Royal Family will carry on as before, with their focus on leading the Nation through the Coronavirus pandemic, the mask has started to slip for Harry and Meghan.

Are they the couple who escaped the grip of the unfair and jealous Monarchy, or the couple who couldn’t bare being second best? Only time will tell, but I have a feeling that more and more already know the answer.

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