BRITAIN'S BEST BEACHES

We countdown the top 15 beaches Britain has to offer!

Britain boasts some of the best coastline in the world. From the Southern Peninsula of Cornwall, to the Channel Islands, there are so many beautiful bays and coves, but which are the best? We’ve ranked the top 15 beaches you have to visit!
beaches
15. West Wittering, Sussex

This fine, open stretch strand of sand which overlooks the Solent and Chichester harbour is impeccably clean an at low tide there are pools for young children to paddle in.

The beach is incredibly popular, so get there early to bag a parking spot, and to avoid any long queues.

There is also a well-run beach café serving an impressive range of snacks and sandwiches.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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14. Studland Bay, Dorset

Four miles of pristine white sand descends into milky-blue waters, and with a backdrop of dunes and heathland, Studland Bay is a gem of the British Coastline.

Popular with families, it is most easily reached by chain ferry.

The local National Trust Beach Café serves hot and cold main meals and snacks.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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13. Chesil Beach, Dorset

Stretching 18 miles, this pebble and shingle tombolo is the largest in the UK. Though the origin of the beach continues to be argued over, it forms part of the Dorset and East Devon World Heritage Site.

The Club House is locally situated near the beach and focuses on fresh local fish and seafood. On visiting you can expect an upmarket and relaxed atmosphere.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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12. Luskentyre, Outer Hebrides

On the north-west coast of the Isle of Harris, lies a long stretch of san washed by shallow startingly azure water – Luskentyre.

Mountains outline the horizon, where steel-grey waves are more commonly associated with Scotland.

While there are no cafés within walking distance, Lukenstyre is still one of the UK’s most beautiful scenic picnic spots.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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11. St Brides Bay, Wales

Sheltered from prevailing winds and a favourite with divers, lies St Brides Bay.

There are plenty of rock pools to explore, though it is worth being mindful of tide times. Dominated by the 19th century baronial residence of St Brides Castle, there is also a very interesting Church nearby.

Locally there is the small village of Marloes, which boasts a pub, restaurant and Café/bar.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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10. Bamburgh Castle Beach, Northumberland

Overlooked by the majestic Bamburgh Castle, this stunning stretch of wild coastline offers clear seas and golden sands.

If the day is clear the Farne Islands can be seen as well as Lindisfarne.

The atmospheric pub of The Old Ship Inn, Seahouses has spectacular sweeping sea views as well as delicious sea food which is their speciality.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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9. West Beach, Berneray

Composing of three miles of white sand beach, West Beach is regarded as one of the best beaches in the UK.

Usually quiet, its white sand and turquoise water can make it pass as a tropical paradise. So much so, Thailand’s tourist board wrongly used an image of the beach to promote their own.

With spectacular views of the distant mountain ranges of the Outer Hebrides, West Beach is worthy of a place on our list.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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8. Plemont Beach, Jersey

Shouldered either side by high cliffs, adventurers will discover one of Jersey’s hidden gems – Plemont Beach.

Boasting the Islands largest caves, Plemont is a crescent-shaped sweep of golden sands and rock pools at low tides.

Popular amongst the Victorians, it is now a photographer hotspot. Though be mindful of the tide times as the beach is completely covered at high tide.

Eat at the Plemont Beach Café which looks out over stunning horizons and serve delicious food all day!


Photo courtesy of Reed Gallery©

beaches
7. Kynance Cove, Cornwall

Cornwall has many stunning seas side locations. But perhaps one of the best is the rugged landscape of Kynance Cove.

The cove, which has been used for numerous film productions boasts spectacular and dramatic ocean currents, making the bay a photographers dream.

Plan any visit by the tide as most of the beach disappears at high tide.

There is a small café selling food and drink and a car park which is free to National Trust members.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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6. Shell Beach, Herm

The small Island of Herm has no roads or vehicles. But what is lacks in modern-day transport it more than makes up for in coastal beaches.

Shell Beach is a stunning bay of glorious white sand that could easily be confused for the Caribbean.

Due to the gradient of the beach you can swim in the waters which go no higher than your waist!

A local restaurant, the Mermaid Tavern sells delicious food at great prices.


Photo courtesy of Reed Gallery©

beaches
5. Robin Hood's Bay, Yorkshire

Yorkshire’s brooding cliffs tower over a huddle of red roofed fishing cottages that make up the quaint village of Robin Hood’s Bay.

The small village whose nickname “Smuggler’s Town” stems from its historic fearsome reputation, also boasts a treasure trove of fossils.

The Laurel Inn is a local pub and restaurant where the bar itself is carved from solid rock!

The village descent is very steep and boasts a maze of cobbled streets and picturesque dwellings.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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4. Sandsend, Yorkshire

Against a backdrop of grassy cliffs where the wide sweep of Whitby ends, is nestled Sandsend.

This stretch of beach is quieter and prettier that its famous and popular neighbour.

A great place for families, where little ones can play in the adjoining beck, it is also a fossil hunters paradise at low tide.

The Woodlands is an amazing place to eat close to the beach. Though it is worth noting, the café is closed on Mondays.


Photo courtesy of National Trust©

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3. St Quen's Beach, Jersey

Stretching 5 miles across the Island of Jersey lies St Quen. The largest beach on the Island, it is a surfing hot spot and a photographer’s paradise.

The beach boasts a cacophony of places to eat, including Le Braye beachside café and La Pulente Pub/Restaurant. Both serve delicious food at affordable prices.

Due to the beach being flat, it is completely covered at high tide, so be mindful of tide times.


Photo courtesy of Reed Gallery©

beaches
2. Sennen Cove, Cornwall

The small coastal village of Sennen Cove brags one of Cornwall and UK’s best beaches.

A popular surfing hotspot, it is a paradise for both surfers and photographers who ride and capture the impressive ocean swells.

It is also the home of the RNLI, and their Lifeboat House is open all year round to visit, as well as local art and craft shops and galleries.

The Old Success Pub is the best place to eat, serving delicious food at affordable prices.


Photo courtesy of Reed Gallery©

beaches
1. Porthcurno, Cornwall

Beneath the clifftop of Minnack Theatre lies Britain’s most arguably beautiful beach. Caught between steep cliffs sits Porthcurno, a stunning valley of white-sand and shell beaches with a formidable surf to match.

It’s best to see at low tide as other bays are revealed with the retreating seas, one which is a nudist beach.

You can eat at a local coffee shop or grab an Ice Cream at the pop-up stall in the Porthcurno car park.


Photo courtesy of Reed Gallery©